Why Natural Capital?

Global Forests Play Complex & Multifaceted Role in Delivering Food Security

21st February 2018
Published under: Why Natural Capital?

This article was originally published on Foodtank. “The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) 2017 report on the State of Food Security and Nutrition (SOFI) estimates that 815 million people go hungry every day, despite the fact that more than enough food is produced to feed us all. Feeding the world is the most important challenge… [more]

Natural Coastal Defences Offer More Than Protection From Extreme Weather Events; They Also Help Create Ecosystems

21st February 2018
Published under: Enabling Environment,Why Natural Capital?

This article was originally published on Phys.org “As sea levels rise and coastal communities face the threat of erosion and flooding, coastal defence structures, often built with concrete, have become the norm in many parts of the world. But these hard engineered structures, like seawalls, breakwaters and groynes, are both expensive and bad for the… [more]

As Oceans Warm, the World’s Kelp Forests Begin to Disappear

20th February 2018
Published under: Why Natural Capital?

This article was originally published on Yale Environment 360.  “Kelp forests — luxuriant coastal ecosystems that are home to a wide variety of marine biodiversity — are being wiped out from Tasmania to California, replaced by sea urchin barrens that are nearly devoid of life. A steady increase in ocean temperatures — nearly 3 degrees… [more]

Beyond Biodiversity: A New Way of Looking at How Species Interconnect

20th February 2018
Published under: Enabling Environment,Why Natural Capital?

This article was originally published on Yale Environment 360. “In a development that has important implications for conservation, scientists are increasingly focusing not just on what species are present in an ecosystem, but on the roles that certain key species play in shaping their environment.  In 1966, an ecologist at the University of Washington named Robert Paine removed… [more]

Earthquake Induced Spawning of ‘Rarest Fish in the World’ Located Over 2,000 Miles Away

19th February 2018
Published under: Why Natural Capital?

This article was originally published on Mongabay.  An earthquake that struck Alaska, U.S., on Jan. 23 caused more than 1-foot high waves in Devils Hole, a small water-filled limestone cave in the Death Valley National Park in Nevada, more than 2,000 miles away. Devils Hole is the only known natural habitat of the incredibly rare… [more]

Increasing Fragmentation of Tropical Forests Could ‘Increase Carbon Emissions Worldwide By Another Third’

19th February 2018
Published under: Data Tools & Methodologies,Why Natural Capital?

This article was originally published on Phys.org “Tropical forests around the world play a key role in the global carbon cycle and harbour more than half of the species worldwide. However, increases in land use in recent decades caused unprecedented losses of tropical forest. Scientists at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) have adapted… [more]