Why Natural Capital?

Study Identifies Key Species Which Act as Warning Signs of Ecosystem Collapse

19th August 2016
Published under: Data Tools & Methodologies,Why Natural Capital?

James Dyke explains how the success or failure of certain species can be used to predict the future health of an entire ecosystem. “The Earth’s biodiversity is under attack. We would need to travel back over 65 million years to find rates of species loss as high as we are witnessing today. Conservation often focuses… [more]

What Can Snails Tell Us About Water Quality?

15th August 2016
Published under: Why Natural Capital?

By Jenny Rogers “For the past 20 years, biologist Pete McIntyre has traveled to Africa’s Lake Tanganyika, Earth’s second-largest freshwater lake by volume, to study freshwater snails found nowhere else in the world. McIntyre, a professor with the University of Wisconsin-Madison, explains why these snails are important and what they tell us about pollution in… [more]

Mapping Natural Capital: Where are the Ecosystems that People Rely on?

15th August 2016
Published under: Enabling Environment,Why Natural Capital?

A great resource from Conservation International, outlining some of the ecosystems that humans relys on in order to survive, and how Conservation International are working to protect them. “In order to protect and manage our natural capital, we need to know where it is located. The forests that regulate our climate. The rivers that provide sources… [more]

Government Must ‘Tap Global Reservoir of Free Capital’ to Invest in Green Infrastructure

12th August 2016
Published under: Enabling Environment,Why Natural Capital?

                      “The UK Government should boost economic growth by “tapping a global reservoir of free capital” to invest in sustainable infrastructure for energy, transport and cities, according to two new reports published today (12 August) by research institutions at the London School of Economics and… [more]

Poverty is Endangering the Prized Hilsa Fish in Bangladesh

12th August 2016
Published under: Why Natural Capital?

Fishermen along the Meghna river are forced to violate the ban on catching the fish during the breeding season due to high levels of poverty. “Hilsa is one of the most important fish in the Bay of Bengal, which has traditional importance in the Bengali culture, apart from being economically and nutritionally significant. More than… [more]

The Ivory Trade isn’t just a Disaster for Elephants. It Threatens our Future too

12th August 2016
Published under: Why Natural Capital?

By Ian Redmond “…Until recently, tropical forest trees were valued economically by the outside world only for their beautiful hardwood timber. Enshrined in the Paris climate agreement, however, is a new economic value – the sequestration and storage of gigatonnes of carbon. The inclusion of forest carbon in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change… [more]