This article was originally published on Olam


“Water is something most of us take for granted. We turn on the tap and it flows. We buy it in bottles. We use it to grow gardens and irrigate food crops. Yet it’s amongst the most precious natural capital on earth. But after decades of deliberation on policy and talk of collaboration, making a real impact on alleviating the calls on this valuable natural resource remains elusive.

As a resource, water is incredibly challenging to measure, monitor or mediate. By the very nature of its sources of supply, water cannot be neatly ring-fenced along administrative or geographical boundaries and everyone is vested in it – with interconnected and often competing interests. Yet water scarcity affects more than 40 percent of the global population[1], and at least 1.8 billion people globally use a source of drinking water that is fecally contaminated[2]…”

Read on at: Olam.