Why Natural Capital?

Mapping Blue Carbon in Mangroves Worldwide

3rd August 2018
Published under: Why Natural Capital?

This article was originally published on Phys.org  “Mangroves are tropical forests that thrive in salt water and are found in a variety of coastal settings from deltas to estuaries to weathered reefs and limestone rocks worldwide. Mangroves can store greater amounts of carbon than any other terrestrial ecosystem, which helps reduce the amount of carbon… [more]

In Strange Twist Invasive Tropical Plant Removes Metal Pollutants from Britain’s Rivers

3rd August 2018
Published under: Why Natural Capital?

This article was originally published on Phys.org “Pollutants in rivers and other water bodies are a serious problem for marine life as well as human health. However, removing them from the water can be a costly process, often requiring energy from fossil fuels, which adds to both operating costs and environmental damage. Consequently, using plants… [more]

The Conservation of Abundance in Nonthreatened Species

2nd August 2018
Published under: Enabling Environment,Why Natural Capital?

This paper was originally published in Conservation Biology. “Abstract: Human modification of the environment is driving declines in population size and distributional extent of much of the world’s biota. These declines extend to many of the most abundant and widespread species, where proportionally small declines can result in the loss of vast numbers of individuals, biomass,… [more]

Scientists Incorporate Ecological Processes to Streamline Agricultural Wastewater Treatment

2nd August 2018
Published under: Enabling Environment,Why Natural Capital?

This article was originally published on Phys.org  “The quest to develop greener and more affordable methods to treat wastewater has taken a new, innovative twist. A team of international scientists, led by water engineering experts from the University of Exeter, has pioneered an innovative new method to incorporate ecological processes to allow ‘green’ water treatment… [more]

World Bank: Ivory Coast Has Lost 25% of its Natural Capital in 25 Years & 80% of Forests Since 1970

1st August 2018
Published under: Why Natural Capital?

This article was originally published on The World Bank. “It is easy to be alarmed about climate change, and, unfortunately, with good reason.  Although experts cannot predict the future with certainty, they agree that Côte d’Ivoire will experience hotter temperatures and more variable, albeit more intense, rainfall, with masses of land being engulfed by rising… [more]

Seagrass Meadows Play Localized Role in Alleviating Ocean Acidification in Coastal Ecosystems

1st August 2018
Published under: Why Natural Capital?

This article was originally published on Phys.org “Seagrass meadows could play a limited, localized role in alleviating ocean acidification in coastal ecosystems, according to new work led by Carnegie’s David Koweek and including Carnegie’s Ken Caldeira and published in Ecological Applications. When coal, oil, or gas is burned, the resulting carbon dioxide is released into the… [more]