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Halting tree-felling and land clearance is not enough to save tropical rainforests without programmes of forest restoration in degraded areas, scientists say.


“The ecological and carbon cost of rainforest destruction goes on accumulating for years after nations halt the conversion of canopy into farmland, scientists have found.

This implies that to meet ambitious targets, global strategies to combat climate change – including forest restoration – should have started years ago.

Tropical forests soak up vast quantities of carbon dioxide released by industrial combustion of fossil fuels, limiting global warming.

Burning, clear-felling and ploughing of forest lands release centuries of stored carbon back into the atmosphere to accelerate global warming and climate change.

So forest conservation and carbon emissions reduction are both vital parts of any strategies to contain global temperature rises.

Researchers report in the journal Current Biology that they looked at the history of forest clearance in the tropics to work out the ups and downs of the forest carbon budget and estimate the loss of species that make the rainforests their home…”

Read on at: Climate Home