NPS photo. Devil’s Hole pupfish.

This article was originally published on Mongabay


  • An earthquake that struck Alaska, U.S., on Jan. 23 caused more than 1-foot high waves in Devils Hole, a small water-filled limestone cave in the Death Valley National Park in Nevada, more than 2,000 miles away.
  • Devils Hole is the only known natural habitat of the incredibly rare Devils Hole pupfish.
  • Immediately after the waves hit the pool, the pupfish started spawning, indicated by the females turning a drab olive brown, which made the brilliant blue males stand out.

“Last month, a powerful 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck in the northwest Pacific, rocking Alaska, U.S. More than 3,200 kilometers (2,000 miles) away, the earthquake on Jan. 23 caused waves over 30 centimeters (1 foot) high in Devils Hole, a small water-filled limestone cave in the Death Valley National Park in Nevada. Devils Hole is the only known natural habitat of the incredibly rare Devils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis).

“It’s crazy that distant earthquakes affect Devils Hole,” Kevin Wilson, aquatic ecologist for Death Valley National Park, said in a statement. “We’ve seen this a few times before, but it still amazes me.” The earthquake-triggered waves set off a series of ripple effects on the critically endangered pupfish, considered to be the world’s rarest fish, and its habitat…”

Read on at: Mongabay.