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This article was originally published on Nature

For sustainable, equitable nutrition we must count the true global costs and benefits of food production, urge Pavan Sukhdev, Peter May and Alexander Müller.


“Current patterns of crop and livestock production and of processing, transport and consumption, are not delivering healthy, nutritious food to society. They are generating large and unacceptable impacts on the environment and on vulnerable populations.

Food systems are now the source of 60% of terrestrial biodiversity loss, 24% of greenhouse-gas emissions, 33% of soil degradation and 61% of the depletion of commercial fish stocks1. And the increasing homogenization of food sources worldwide is narrowing the genetic diversity in animals and plants that is crucial to secure human nutritional needs against climatic and other changes.

Food systems are undermining human health all over the world, by permitting, or even promoting, inappropriate diets or unsafe foods. As the Global Nutrition Report, released this September puts it: “Diet is now the number-one risk factor for the global burden of disease”2…”

Read on at: Nature.