This article was originally published on Phys.org


“An international collaboration of hundreds of scientists—led in part by the Forest Advanced Computing and Artificial Intelligence (FACAI) Laboratory in Purdue’s Department of Forestry and Natural Resources—has developed the world’s first global map of tree symbioses. The map is key to understanding how forests are changing and the role climate plays in these shifts.

The findings, reported today in the journal Nature, come from the Global Forest Biodiversity Initiative (GFBI), a consortium of  scientists and practitioners of which the FACAI Lab is a key hub and global center. Jingjing Liang, a Purdue University assistant professor of quantitative forest ecology, is co-supervisor the FACAI Lab, coordinator and cofounder of the GFBI and co-lead author of the paper. Mo Zhou, a Purdue assistant professor of forest economics and management, is a senior author of the paper, co-supervisor of the FACAI lab and lead economist of the GFBI.

Purdue’s FACAI lab employs  and machine learning to study global, regional and local forest resource management and biodiversity conservation…

Read on at: Phys.org