This article was originally published on The Conversation.


“After extensive review, our team of international researchers came to the conclusion that meeting the Aichi Targets would have benefits far beyond biodiversity — it will improve human health and well-being via economic and environmental stability.

Focusing on the costs of implementing this plan makes it seem daunting, but our research suggests that failing to invest will have an even more frightening economic cost.

…If the world is to increase its chance of meeting the Aichi Targets and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, countries must find ways to bring biodiversity into the mainstream.

They could, for example, integrate it into their national accounting systems. They must also enhance the links between climate change policies and biodiversity conservation, and its sustainable use.

It’s also crucial that we recognize the in-kind contributions of Indigenous peoples’ and local communities’ collective actions, efforts and knowledge on conservation and sustainable use.

Investing in biodiversity would almost surely reduce the vulnerability of nations and communities to climate-related issues, while increasing their resilience and capacity to adapt.”

Read on at: The Conversation