This article was originally published on Phys.org


“Mixed forests are more productive than monocultures. This is true on all five continents, and particularly in regions with high precipitation. These findings from an international overview study, in which the Technical University of Munich (TUM) participated, are highly relevant for forest science and forest management on a global scale.

“We know of the many advantages of mixed forests,” states Professor Hans Pretzsch, co-author of the study and author of a recent book on the ecology and management of mixed-species stands. “Mixed-species forests are ecologically more valuable as versatile habitats. They mitigate climate change, as they mean a higher carbon sink.”

Trees in mixed-species forests are often better supplied with light, water, and soil nutrients via their complementary crown and root systems. “This makes mixed stands more resilient during dry years. In addition, they are more stable against pests and visually more appealing,” adds Prof. Pretzsch from the Chair of Forest Growth and Yield Science in Weihenstephan…”

Read on at Phys.org.