This article was originally published on Mongabay


  • At the Global Landscapes Forum’s third investment case symposium, held at the World Bank Group’s International Finance Corporation in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, top investors, business leaders, and policymakers gathered to present their efforts and advice on how to build a critical mass of work that will lead to a stronger investment case for sustainable landscapes and restoration.
  • Over 200 people attended the symposium to discuss ways to speed up the pace of financial investments aimed at creating more resilient, fair, profitable, and climate-friendly landscapes. Conversations, disagreements, and challenges arose over how to combine efforts that will lead to lasting change.
  • Accounting for natural capital, putting a price on carbon, and processes to secure land tenure rights emerged as key issues.

At the Global Landscapes Forum’s third investment case symposium, held at the World Bank Group’s International Finance Corporation in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, top investors, business leaders, and policymakers gathered to present their efforts and advice on how to build a critical mass of work that will lead to a stronger investment case for sustainable landscapes and restoration.

Over 200 people attended the symposium to discuss ways to speed up the pace of financial investments aimed at creating more resilient, fair, profitable, and climate-friendly landscapes. Conversations, disagreements, and challenges arose over how to combine efforts that will lead to lasting change. Accounting for natural capital, putting a price on carbon, and processes to secure land tenure rights emerged as key issues.

In order to entice large amounts of private capital investment into funds that support sustainable global landscapes, those funds will need to grow much larger than what has been proposed thus far, according to Jennifer Pryce, President and CEO of Calvert Impact Capital, which has raised $1.5 billion in capital from private investors over the past 20 years and channeled that money to mission-driven organizations. “In many situations, a $20 million fund is boutique. It’s not going to be on many eyeballs,” Pryce said. “For this to scale, $500 million is interesting.”

To achieve scale, Pryce said billions will need to be invested to achieve sustainability and restoration goals; and much work will need to be done on evaluating risk, creating public-private partnerships, and connecting sustainable businesses to traditional financial markets…”

Read on at: Mongabay.