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This article was originally published on AECOM


“There is a growing call to incorporate green infrastructure within new and existing developments. Natural assets clean the air and water, reduce flood risk, and help regulate climate at both micro and macro scales; they also improve quality of life and raise real estate values accordingly. Green infrastructure can take various forms, from green roofs and living walls, to public parks and major schemes like New York’s High Line and London’s proposed Garden Bridge.

The ideal urban scenario is the creation of a city-wide network of green infrastructure which provides the ecosystem services that facilitate growth and prosperity. Strategic planning at the city scale is critical, and London is showing leadership in this area. The Greater London Authority has recently published Natural Capital: Investing in a Green Infrastructure for a Future London.

Although city-wide planning for green infrastructure is important, area masterplans and individual projects can also play a key role, and planning authorities are likely to look favourably on proposals that integrate multi-functional green infrastructure from the start. Thinking big could increasingly pay dividends. Could you link green spaces in your development to those in neighbouring areas, helping to create a network of green infrastructure that facilitates walking and cycling and better health? In particular, cities and developers could consider natural rather than hard solutions to flood risk, something that will increase with climate change…”

Read on at: AECOM.